• Money's Best Friend: Investing In Equity Markets Through Mutual Funds

    In this episode of Money's Best Friend, Watch how to invest in Equity markets through mutual funds. Follow us: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYPvAwZP8pZhSMW8qs7cVCw?sub_confirmation=1 Twitter: https://twitter.com/IndiaToday Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IndiaToday

    published: 11 Jul 2015
  • Arise Xchange: John Manley - Market Correction? Andrew Rosario Super Sports Saturday

    Andrew Schmertz speaks with John Manley of Wells Fargo Funds Management about whether or not the market is heading towards a Correction; and Arise News Sports Correspondent, Andrew Rosario, about Super Sports Saturday.

    published: 05 May 2015
  • Using your Vanguard Brokerage Account

    Watch this short video to learn how your brokerage account works and about the different types of investments you can hold. All investing is subject to risk, including the possible loss of the money you invest. The possibility of lower account service fees is based on the potential fee in a single Vanguard brokerage account versus potential fees across multiple mutual fund accounts. **For more information about Vanguard funds, Vanguard ETF shares, or non-Vanguard funds offered through Vanguard Brokerage Services, visit vanguard.com, or call 800-662-2739, to obtain a prospectus. Investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other important information about a fund are contained in the prospectus; read and consider it carefully before investing.** An investment in a money market fu...

    published: 05 Feb 2015
  • Building an emergency fund

    See why creating an emergency fund is so important, and how it can protect you when unexpected costs arise.

    published: 28 Nov 2016
  • The Battle Between Investment Banks, Hedge Funds, and Private Equity on Wall Street (2009)

    The investment banking industry has come under criticism for a variety of reasons, including perceived conflicts of interest, overly large pay packages, cartel-like or oligopolic behavior, taking both sides in transactions, and more. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0470222794/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0470222794&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=122da9b4ed66d7e4eb80287e1bee5b2a Investment banking has also been criticized for its opacity. Conflicts of interest may arise between different parts of a bank, creating the potential for market manipulation, according to critics. Authorities that regulate investment banking (the FSA in the United Kingdom and the SEC in the United States) require that banks impose a "Chinese wall" to prevent commu...

    published: 10 Aug 2014
  • Billionaire James Simons: Conquering Wall Street with Mathematics

    A speech and Q&A with billionaire and the second richest hedge fund manager in the world, James Simons. In this speech James talks about his life, career and the events that lead him to starting Renaissance Technologies. James also goes on to speak about why Renaissance technologies is so successful and his guiding principles for life. Like if you enjoyed Subscribe for more:http://bit.ly/InvestorsArchive Follow us on twitter:http://bit.ly/TwitterIA Other great Stock Market Investor videos:⬇ Ray Dalio on Hedge funds, Success and Life/Work: http://bit.ly/RDVid1 Charlie Munger on Common sense and Investing:http://bit.ly/CMVid1 Video Segments: 0:00 Introduction 4:25 Early Life 8:04 MIT 10:35 Road trip to South America 12:18 Berkley 13:18 First investments 18:20 Urge to do something d...

    published: 18 Feb 2017
  • Mutual Fund Returns calculation in Excel

    To calculate internal rate of return on mutual fund scheme. ABC Ltd. bought 100,000 units (of Liquid mutual fund scheme) of Face value 10.00 per unit. ABC ltd invested on 5thMarch 2013 at a NAV of 11.50 per unit. The company received dividends of 1% on 15th March 2013 and 1% on 30th March 2013. If the company redeems the entire holding of liquid units at NAV of 11.32 per unit on 31th Mar 2013, what returns would it have got from this short term investment?

    published: 29 Dec 2012
  • Alternative High Yield Investments- How to Earn 12% On Your Money

    Want to Learn How to get your money to Earn 12% ? FREE Educational webinar Reveals • Secrets to Locating 12% investments...They may be right in front of you • The BEST Way to determine if the asset is worthy of your investment ... • The #1 reason why NOW is the best time to take advantage of the 12% solution • Why your banker financial planner and money manager have been keeping this 12% investment strategy from you...The reason may shock you • The 4 Must have documents to secure your investment...so you can sleep well knowing your money is safe • The #1 Secret Mitt Romney- Trump and Buffet Use that grows their wealth TAX FREE / Deferred and how YOU can use it to your advantage...This will put you on a whole new financial path • How you can Start the 12% solution with as little ...

    published: 24 Sep 2012
  • Wells Fargo Scandal: 5 Things you Need to Know!

    Wells Fargo Scandal: 5 Thing you Need to Know! Subscribe http://goo.gl/Q2kKrD Employees of the Giant US Bank Wells Fargo spent years setting up fake accounts in order to scam money from customers. WatchMojo News presents 5 facts about the scandal, examining how and why the fraud came about, who committed it, what kind of effect it had, what are the larger implications for banking in America. WatchMojo's Social Media Pages http://www.Facebook.com/WatchMojo http://www.Twitter.com/WatchMojo http://instagram.com/watchmojo Get WatchMojo merchandise at http://watchmojo.com/store/ WatchMojo’s ten thousand videos on Top 10 lists, Origins, Biographies, Tips, How To’s, Reviews, Commentary and more on Pop Culture, Celebrity, Movies, Music, TV, Film, Video Games, Politics, News, Comics, Superher...

    published: 15 Sep 2016
  • 7 Painful Ways to Lose Money Investing in Bonds

    Did you know that there are 7 different ways to lose money investing in bonds? That’s right, investing in bonds isn’t always a safe and low-risk investment. However, once you know and understand the risk associated with bond trading, then the chances of you losing money go down drastically. To download your FREE Report called, “The 7 Ways To Lose Money With Bonds”, check out: http://www.retirementthinktank.com/bondreport Now bonds have traditionally been viewed as a very safe way to create a steady stream of cash flow, and many brokers and financial advisors recommend bonds as part of a solid balance to any financial portfolio. And all of that is true…most of the time. The big issue with bond risk (and how people lose money with bonds) is when any of these 7 risk factors arise. And ev...

    published: 24 Aug 2014
  • 08 common Interview question and answers - Job Interview Skills

    08 common Interview question and answers - Job Interview Skills 1. "Tell me a little about yourself." You should take this opportunity to show your communication skills by speaking clearly and concisely in an organized manner. Because there is no right or wrong answer for this question, it is important to appear friendly. 2. "What are your strengths?" This is a popular interview question. They want to know what you think of yourself. Although this is a general question, there is a wrong and right answer. The wrong answer is a generic answer saying you are organized and friendly. Although it will not hurt you during the interview, it will certainly not help you either. Answer this question based on the type of job you are applying for. 3. "What are your weaknesses?" For this answer,...

    published: 29 Jun 2014
  • Four Reasons Financial Intermediaries Fail

    As we’ve discussed in previous videos, financial intermediaries bridge savers and borrowers. When these bridges crumble, the effects can be disastrous. For businesses, credit shortages can lead to bankruptcy, or layoffs. For individuals, they rely on credit to invest in education or a new home or car. These negative effects show you how crucial intermediaries are to our lives. Still, what exactly causes failed intermediation? Four answers: First, insecure property rights. Simply speaking, when you save money at a bank, you expect the ability to pull out your funds when needed. But what if your deposits are frozen? Or confiscated altogether? For instance, in 2013 amidst a financial crisis, the government in Cyprus confiscated bank deposits to help pay down the country’s budget shortfall....

    published: 26 Jul 2016
  • Stock investing vs. Real Estate: What is Better?

    Stock investing or real estate, what's a better investment for the average investor? From our real estate rental property we would expect to have these upside expectations: Capital appreciation would fall into the historical range of 4 to 6 % per year over a 10-year period. Cash flow from the monthly rental income after all expenses would be in the range of 8 - 12%. This is often known as being in the sweet spot in rental real estate. And we would expect a reasonable total return of 12 - 18%, if all goes well. So what are some of the downside expectations of rental real estate? First you have the responsibility of dealing with emergencies, such as fixing toilets and faucets or addressing tenant issues at possibly all hours of the day. Second, there is the time and cost of marketing the p...

    published: 10 Jun 2012
  • Subprime Crisis in a Nutshell - 2008, Financial Meltdown Explained

    2008, Financial Meltdown Explained A financial crisis that arose in the mortgage market after a sharp increase in mortgage foreclosures, mainly subprime, collapsed numerous mortgage lenders and hedge funds. The meltdown spilled over into the global credit market as risk premiums increased rapidly and capital liquidity was reduced. The sharp increase in foreclosures and the problems in the subprime mortgage market were largely blamed on loose lending practices, low interest rates, a housing bubble and excessive risk taking by lenders and investors. It is also known as the "subprime collapse" or "subprime crisis". Following the tech bubble and the events of September 11, the Federal Reserve stimulated a struggling economy by cutting interest rates to historically low levels. As a result...

    published: 13 Jan 2014
  • Why the Amazon-Whole Foods Deal Is Bad for Markets

    Jun.16 -- Bloomberg's Oliver Renick explains why investors aren't thrilled about Amazon.com Inc.'s purchase of Whole Foods Market Inc. He speaks with Bloomberg's Vonnie Quinn on "Bloomberg Markets."

    published: 16 Jun 2017
  • Robert FREY - 180 years of Market Drawdowns

    Friends of IHES held the Mathematical Finance colloquium “An Analysis of 180 Years of Market Drawdowns” on 30 June 2015 at 6.00 pm in New York, in presence of Emmanuel Ullmo, the IHÉS director. Presentation was made by Dr. Robert J. Frey, Director, Program in Quantitative Finance, Stony Brook University and former managing director with hedge funds. After 25 years as an applied mathematician in industry, the last 15 years spent in quantitative finance as a managing director with a well-known hedge fund, Dr Robert J. Frey retired in 2004 and embarked on an academic career. His focus is on risk management, modeling the process of managing complex and dynamic portfolios, particularly those that naturally arise in so-called alternative investment strategies. This interest has found its expre...

    published: 22 Jul 2015
Money's Best Friend: Investing In Equity Markets Through Mutual Funds

Money's Best Friend: Investing In Equity Markets Through Mutual Funds

  • Order:
  • Duration: 21:03
  • Updated: 11 Jul 2015
  • views: 3272
videos
In this episode of Money's Best Friend, Watch how to invest in Equity markets through mutual funds. Follow us: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYPvAwZP8pZhSMW8qs7cVCw?sub_confirmation=1 Twitter: https://twitter.com/IndiaToday Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IndiaToday
https://wn.com/Money's_Best_Friend_Investing_In_Equity_Markets_Through_Mutual_Funds
Arise Xchange: John Manley - Market Correction? Andrew Rosario Super Sports Saturday

Arise Xchange: John Manley - Market Correction? Andrew Rosario Super Sports Saturday

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:14
  • Updated: 05 May 2015
  • views: 41
videos
Andrew Schmertz speaks with John Manley of Wells Fargo Funds Management about whether or not the market is heading towards a Correction; and Arise News Sports Correspondent, Andrew Rosario, about Super Sports Saturday.
https://wn.com/Arise_Xchange_John_Manley_Market_Correction_Andrew_Rosario_Super_Sports_Saturday
Using your Vanguard Brokerage Account

Using your Vanguard Brokerage Account

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:08
  • Updated: 05 Feb 2015
  • views: 38684
videos
Watch this short video to learn how your brokerage account works and about the different types of investments you can hold. All investing is subject to risk, including the possible loss of the money you invest. The possibility of lower account service fees is based on the potential fee in a single Vanguard brokerage account versus potential fees across multiple mutual fund accounts. **For more information about Vanguard funds, Vanguard ETF shares, or non-Vanguard funds offered through Vanguard Brokerage Services, visit vanguard.com, or call 800-662-2739, to obtain a prospectus. Investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other important information about a fund are contained in the prospectus; read and consider it carefully before investing.** An investment in a money market fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although a money market fund seeks to preserve the value of your investment at $1 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a fund. You must buy and sell Vanguard ETF Shares through a broker like Vanguard Brokerage Services (we offer them commission-free) or through another broker (you may incur commissions). See the Vanguard Brokerage Services commission and fee schedules for limits. Vanguard ETF Shares are not redeemable directly with the issuing fund other than in creation unit aggregations. Like stocks, ETFs are subject to market volatility. When buying or selling an ETF, you will pay or receive the current market price, which may be more or less than net asset value. Vanguard funds not held in a brokerage account are held by The Vanguard Group, Inc., and aren’t protected by SIPC. Brokerage assets are held by Vanguard Brokerage Services, a division of Vanguard Marketing Corporation (VMC), member FINRA and SIPC. Vanguard Marketing Corporation, Distributor of the Vanguard Funds. © 2015 The Vanguard Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
https://wn.com/Using_Your_Vanguard_Brokerage_Account
Building an emergency fund

Building an emergency fund

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:17
  • Updated: 28 Nov 2016
  • views: 4665
videos
See why creating an emergency fund is so important, and how it can protect you when unexpected costs arise.
https://wn.com/Building_An_Emergency_Fund
The Battle Between Investment Banks, Hedge Funds, and Private Equity on Wall Street (2009)

The Battle Between Investment Banks, Hedge Funds, and Private Equity on Wall Street (2009)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 50:18
  • Updated: 10 Aug 2014
  • views: 29962
videos
The investment banking industry has come under criticism for a variety of reasons, including perceived conflicts of interest, overly large pay packages, cartel-like or oligopolic behavior, taking both sides in transactions, and more. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0470222794/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0470222794&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=122da9b4ed66d7e4eb80287e1bee5b2a Investment banking has also been criticized for its opacity. Conflicts of interest may arise between different parts of a bank, creating the potential for market manipulation, according to critics. Authorities that regulate investment banking (the FSA in the United Kingdom and the SEC in the United States) require that banks impose a "Chinese wall" to prevent communication between investment banking on one side and equity research and trading on the other. Critics say such a barrier does not always exist in practice, however. Conflicts of interest often arise in relation to investment banks' equity research units, which have long been part of the industry. A common practice is for equity analysts to initiate coverage of a company in order to develop relationships that lead to highly profitable investment banking business. In the 1990s, many equity researchers allegedly traded positive stock ratings for investment banking business. Alternatively, companies may threaten to divert investment banking business to competitors unless their stock was rated favorably. Laws were passed to criminalize such acts, and increased pressure from regulators and a series of lawsuits, settlements, and prosecutions curbed this business to a large extent following the 2001 stock market tumble after the dot-com bubble. Philip Augar, author of The Greed Merchants, said in an interview that, "You cannot simultaneously serve the interest of issuer clients and investing clients. And it's not just underwriting and sales; investment banks run proprietary trading operations that are also making a profit out of these securities."[30] Many investment banks also own retail brokerages. During the 1990s, some retail brokerages sold consumers securities which did not meet their stated risk profile. This behavior may have led to investment banking business or even sales of surplus shares during a public offering to keep public perception of the stock favorable. Since investment banks engage heavily in trading for their own account, there is always the temptation for them to engage in some form of front running -- the illegal practice whereby a broker executes orders for their own account before filling orders previously submitted by their customers, there benefiting from any changes in prices induced by those orders. Documents under seal in a decade-long lawsuit concerning eToys.com's IPO but obtained by New York Times' Wall Street Business columnist Joe Nocera alleged that IPOs managed by Goldman Sachs and other investment bankers involved asking for kickbacks from their institutional clients who made large profits flipping IPOs which Goldman had intentionally undervalued. Depositions in the lawsuit alleged that clients willingly complied with these demands because they understood it was necessary in order to participate in future hot issues.[32] Reuters Wall Street correspondent Felix Salmon retracted his earlier, more conciliatory, statements on the subject and said he believed that the depositions show that companies going public and their initial consumer stockholders are both defrauded by this practice, which may be widespread throughout the IPO finance industry.[33] The case is ongoing, and the allegations remain unproven. Investment banking is often criticized for the enormous pay packages awarded to those who work in the industry. According to Bloomberg Wall Street's five biggest firms paid over $3 billion to their executives from 2003 to 2008, "while they presided over the packaging and sale of loans that helped bring down the investment-banking system." [34] The highly generous pay packages include $172 million for Merrill Lynch & Co. CEO Stanley O'Neal from 2003 to 2007, before it was bought by Bank of America in 2008, and $161 million for Bear Stearns Co.'s James Cayne before the bank collapsed and was sold to JPMorgan Chase & Co. in June 2008.[34] Such pay arrangements have attracted the ire of Democrats and Republicans in Congress, who demanded limits on executive pay in 2008 when the U.S. government was bailing out the industry with a $700 billion financial rescue package.[34] Writing in the Global Association of Risk Professionals, Aaron Brown, a vice president at Morgan Stanley, says "By any standard of human fairness, of course, investment bankers make obscene amounts of money." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Investment_bank
https://wn.com/The_Battle_Between_Investment_Banks,_Hedge_Funds,_And_Private_Equity_On_Wall_Street_(2009)
Billionaire James Simons: Conquering Wall Street with Mathematics

Billionaire James Simons: Conquering Wall Street with Mathematics

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:20:37
  • Updated: 18 Feb 2017
  • views: 107064
videos
A speech and Q&A with billionaire and the second richest hedge fund manager in the world, James Simons. In this speech James talks about his life, career and the events that lead him to starting Renaissance Technologies. James also goes on to speak about why Renaissance technologies is so successful and his guiding principles for life. Like if you enjoyed Subscribe for more:http://bit.ly/InvestorsArchive Follow us on twitter:http://bit.ly/TwitterIA Other great Stock Market Investor videos:⬇ Ray Dalio on Hedge funds, Success and Life/Work: http://bit.ly/RDVid1 Charlie Munger on Common sense and Investing:http://bit.ly/CMVid1 Video Segments: 0:00 Introduction 4:25 Early Life 8:04 MIT 10:35 Road trip to South America 12:18 Berkley 13:18 First investments 18:20 Urge to do something different/ First business 20:26 Back to academia 26:09 Opposing the war/ Getting fired 30:45 Stony Brook University 36:26 Managing money 39:39 Becoming a trader 45:53 Renaissance technologies/ What makes it successful 49:40 Simons foundation 54:04 Mathematics as a refuge 55:40 Retirement 57:19 Guiding principles 1:00:45 Start of Q&A 1:01:12 When not to do something? 1:02:20 Thoughts on hedge fund industry today? 1:04:31 Why do you focus on collaborative goals? 1:06:30 How did your parents help foster your mathematical knowledge? 1:07:15 When you look back, would you change anything? 1:08:14 Do you think you should share your knowledge? 1:09:52 Thoughts on mathematics education? 1:17:55 Bourbaki movement? Interview Date: 30th October, 2014 Event: The American Mathematical Society and the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute Original Image Source:http://bit.ly/JSimmonsPic Investors Archive has videos of all the Investing/Business/Economic/Finance masters. Learn from their wisdom for free in one place. For more check out the channel. Remember to subscribe, share, comment and like! No advertising.
https://wn.com/Billionaire_James_Simons_Conquering_Wall_Street_With_Mathematics
Mutual Fund Returns calculation in Excel

Mutual Fund Returns calculation in Excel

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:12
  • Updated: 29 Dec 2012
  • views: 35384
videos
To calculate internal rate of return on mutual fund scheme. ABC Ltd. bought 100,000 units (of Liquid mutual fund scheme) of Face value 10.00 per unit. ABC ltd invested on 5thMarch 2013 at a NAV of 11.50 per unit. The company received dividends of 1% on 15th March 2013 and 1% on 30th March 2013. If the company redeems the entire holding of liquid units at NAV of 11.32 per unit on 31th Mar 2013, what returns would it have got from this short term investment?
https://wn.com/Mutual_Fund_Returns_Calculation_In_Excel
Alternative High Yield Investments- How to Earn 12% On Your Money

Alternative High Yield Investments- How to Earn 12% On Your Money

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:15:24
  • Updated: 24 Sep 2012
  • views: 24413
videos
Want to Learn How to get your money to Earn 12% ? FREE Educational webinar Reveals • Secrets to Locating 12% investments...They may be right in front of you • The BEST Way to determine if the asset is worthy of your investment ... • The #1 reason why NOW is the best time to take advantage of the 12% solution • Why your banker financial planner and money manager have been keeping this 12% investment strategy from you...The reason may shock you • The 4 Must have documents to secure your investment...so you can sleep well knowing your money is safe • The #1 Secret Mitt Romney- Trump and Buffet Use that grows their wealth TAX FREE / Deferred and how YOU can use it to your advantage...This will put you on a whole new financial path • How you can Start the 12% solution with as little as $50,000 to as much as $5,000,000 or more retirement income investment, investing a lump sum, private investment clubs, tax deferred investment, property investment opportunities, high income investment high yield investment program, high yield money market accounts, high interest investment, high yield investment programs, high return investments, high investment return,high yield investment ,high yield cd,index fund best ,best money market rates,high yield savings accounts,short term investments
https://wn.com/Alternative_High_Yield_Investments_How_To_Earn_12_On_Your_Money
Wells Fargo Scandal: 5 Things you Need to Know!

Wells Fargo Scandal: 5 Things you Need to Know!

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:17
  • Updated: 15 Sep 2016
  • views: 152044
videos
Wells Fargo Scandal: 5 Thing you Need to Know! Subscribe http://goo.gl/Q2kKrD Employees of the Giant US Bank Wells Fargo spent years setting up fake accounts in order to scam money from customers. WatchMojo News presents 5 facts about the scandal, examining how and why the fraud came about, who committed it, what kind of effect it had, what are the larger implications for banking in America. WatchMojo's Social Media Pages http://www.Facebook.com/WatchMojo http://www.Twitter.com/WatchMojo http://instagram.com/watchmojo Get WatchMojo merchandise at http://watchmojo.com/store/ WatchMojo’s ten thousand videos on Top 10 lists, Origins, Biographies, Tips, How To’s, Reviews, Commentary and more on Pop Culture, Celebrity, Movies, Music, TV, Film, Video Games, Politics, News, Comics, Superheroes. Your trusted authority on ranking Pop Culture.
https://wn.com/Wells_Fargo_Scandal_5_Things_You_Need_To_Know
7 Painful Ways to Lose Money Investing in Bonds

7 Painful Ways to Lose Money Investing in Bonds

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  • Duration: 14:41
  • Updated: 24 Aug 2014
  • views: 114617
videos
Did you know that there are 7 different ways to lose money investing in bonds? That’s right, investing in bonds isn’t always a safe and low-risk investment. However, once you know and understand the risk associated with bond trading, then the chances of you losing money go down drastically. To download your FREE Report called, “The 7 Ways To Lose Money With Bonds”, check out: http://www.retirementthinktank.com/bondreport Now bonds have traditionally been viewed as a very safe way to create a steady stream of cash flow, and many brokers and financial advisors recommend bonds as part of a solid balance to any financial portfolio. And all of that is true…most of the time. The big issue with bond risk (and how people lose money with bonds) is when any of these 7 risk factors arise. And even worse, when any of the 7 risks combine at the same time, it can prove catastrophic. I will give you a basic review of the 7 different ways to lose money in bonds here: 1. Lack of Liquidity in bonds – Although the bond market is larger than the stock market in total value, there are far fewer bond traders and bond investors comparatively speaking. So when issues arise with a certain bond (like a city or municipality defaulting on their bonds, bankruptcy, etc), it can leave the average investor high and dry with no one to sell their bond to. 2. Interest Rate Fluctuations – Bond prices are inversely related to interest rates, so when interest rates rise, bond prices (the price that you buy and sell bonds) goes down. And with interest rates close to all-time lows today, this is a bubble just waiting to pop once interest rates start rising. And if they rise quickly, watch out bond prices! 3. Bond Creditworthiness – This is an important issue as the creditworthiness of the bond issuer determines the yield, and thus your risk/return. For instance, you might not get a great return on a United States Treasury bond, but you can sleep at night knowing there is little chance it will default. On the other hand, you can get hundreds of times more yield on a low-grade junk bond, but the chances of you losing money (or even all of your investment) go up significantly compared to a US Treasury bill. 4. Inflation / Hyperinflation – Generally speaking, inflation usually means higher interest rates. And since we know that interest rates are inversely related to bond prices, high inflation can destroy the value of your bond. Not to mention, in times of inflation the cost of everything (consumer goods) is going up, while your bond investment doesn’t. So higher inflation could render your bond interest negative after you factor inflation into the equation. 5. Reinvestment Risk – This risk pertains to the opposite issue of the others in that it occurs in times of a slowing economy, or a declining interest rate environment. When interest rates go down, bond investors are forced to reinvest their bond interest (and any return of principal) into new securities that will have lower rates of return. Of course this will reduce the overall income that is being generated by your bond portfolio. 6. Bond Fund “Backfire” – Bond funds have traditionally been considered very safe as they spread the bond risks out amongst many different bonds (versus an individual bond). And this is usually the case. However, bond funds can “backfire” when a bond manager starts replacing bonds as they mature in a rising interest rate environment. And if the bond portfolio loses enough value that investors start leaving the fund in droves, then the bond manager might have to start unloading high yielding bonds to meet the early redemption's. This doesn’t happen that often, but when it does, it is painful to all involved. 7. Making Bad Bond Assumptions – Finally, don’t ever make the assumption that your bond or bond fund is free of risk and can just cruise on auto-pilot without you ever having to review or check up on. This is where many bond investors get into trouble by thinking they can buy it and forget about it. Stay educated on what is going on with your bond, watch interest rates, and don’t chase bond yields! Finally, always get the advice of a licensed bond specialist to make sure that you never get burned by any of these bond risks. To download your FREE “7 Ways To Lose Money With Bonds” Report, go to http://www.retirementthinktank.com/bondreport Disclaimer: Nothing in this video or free report can be or should be construed as investment advice. This is purely educational and there is not enough information in here or the report to make educated investment decisions. Always consult with a financial advisor before making any investment decisions.
https://wn.com/7_Painful_Ways_To_Lose_Money_Investing_In_Bonds
08 common Interview question and answers - Job Interview Skills

08 common Interview question and answers - Job Interview Skills

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:25
  • Updated: 29 Jun 2014
  • views: 6231560
videos
08 common Interview question and answers - Job Interview Skills 1. "Tell me a little about yourself." You should take this opportunity to show your communication skills by speaking clearly and concisely in an organized manner. Because there is no right or wrong answer for this question, it is important to appear friendly. 2. "What are your strengths?" This is a popular interview question. They want to know what you think of yourself. Although this is a general question, there is a wrong and right answer. The wrong answer is a generic answer saying you are organized and friendly. Although it will not hurt you during the interview, it will certainly not help you either. Answer this question based on the type of job you are applying for. 3. "What are your weaknesses?" For this answer, you should display a weakness that can be seen as a strength. There are many types of answers that will work. Some answers will be good answers for certain jobs, while the same answer will be a bad answer for a different job. Select an answer that will work for the position you are applying for. 4. "Where do you see yourself in five years?" This question primarily depends on where you are in your career. A person with 5 years of experience will have different goals than a person with no work experience.This question is asked to see how serious a candidate is about his or her career. Some people might not know their goals, and some people might have goals of becoming rich and retiring early. Those are incorrect answers for this question. The type of answer you want to give is an ambitious answer that shows you really love your career. A good interviewer will read between the lines and find out if a person is going to be a hard worker or just a mediocre one. Being descriptive and shooting for a big goal is something interviewers want to hear. 5. "What do you know about our company?" A typical job interview question, asked to find out how much company research you have conducted, is "What do you know about this company?" Prepare in advance, and in a word, research, so you can provide relevant and current information about your prospective employer to the interviewer. 6. "Are you good at dealing with change?" Dealing with change is common in the work place. A simple yes will not be sufficient to impress the interviewer. This is another type of question where everyone will have similar answers. Of course everyone is going to claim being excellent dealing with change. You got to communicate that you are really good at dealing with change. 7. "Do you work well under pressure?" In most cases, the best answer to this question is answering yes. Working well under pressure is a good trait to have. However, I think if you answer that you work the same with pressure and without pressure, the interviewer will be more impressed. However, you will need to explain in words why this is better. 8. "How do you make important decisions?" There are many ways to answer this question, and if you have a reasonable method of making decisions, it will probably be sufficient. One answer I thought of included not being afraid of asking your manager. You can follow up by saying even the best needs mentoring, and you always want to improve. So basically, this could work as an answer, but depending on the job, you might have a better shot with an answer like my example.
https://wn.com/08_Common_Interview_Question_And_Answers_Job_Interview_Skills
Four Reasons Financial Intermediaries Fail

Four Reasons Financial Intermediaries Fail

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:07
  • Updated: 26 Jul 2016
  • views: 27982
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As we’ve discussed in previous videos, financial intermediaries bridge savers and borrowers. When these bridges crumble, the effects can be disastrous. For businesses, credit shortages can lead to bankruptcy, or layoffs. For individuals, they rely on credit to invest in education or a new home or car. These negative effects show you how crucial intermediaries are to our lives. Still, what exactly causes failed intermediation? Four answers: First, insecure property rights. Simply speaking, when you save money at a bank, you expect the ability to pull out your funds when needed. But what if your deposits are frozen? Or confiscated altogether? For instance, in 2013 amidst a financial crisis, the government in Cyprus confiscated bank deposits to help pay down the country’s budget shortfall. You can see how insecure property rights can scare away potential savers. Second, controls on interest rates. Interest rates are the price of borrowing. Thus, controls on interest rates, often called usury laws, are effectively price ceilings—they set the interest rate lower than the market equilibrium interest rate. With this forced lowering of interest rates, borrowers will want to borrow more, but lenders won’t want to lend. The effect? A lending shortage. Third, politicized lending. Banks profit by assessing risk, and then loaning, based on that assessment. Banks that excel at assessment succeed. Those poor at it die out. Problems arise when the government intervenes to prop up failing banks, resulting in what we call “zombie banks.” In such cases, intervention undercuts normal competition, and intervention tends to favor banks that are politically connected. In fact, it’s been shown that there’s an inverse correlation between government ownership in banks and a country’s GDP per capita and productivity growth. Fourth, you have runs, panics, and scandals. Remember, trust is vital to the financial system. When trust erodes, depositors may rush to withdraw their money from banks, causing what is known as a “bank run.” This can cause banks to fail, as we saw during the Great Depression. Scandals can also depress market confidence. Enron, WorldCom and Bernie Madoff may come to mind. So, which of these four factors contributed to the Great Recession of 2008? We’ll discuss that in our next video. Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/2a64pAF Next video: http://bit.ly/2a2zZe7 Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/SWaW/
https://wn.com/Four_Reasons_Financial_Intermediaries_Fail
Stock investing vs. Real Estate: What is Better?

Stock investing vs. Real Estate: What is Better?

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  • Duration: 5:21
  • Updated: 10 Jun 2012
  • views: 6081
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Stock investing or real estate, what's a better investment for the average investor? From our real estate rental property we would expect to have these upside expectations: Capital appreciation would fall into the historical range of 4 to 6 % per year over a 10-year period. Cash flow from the monthly rental income after all expenses would be in the range of 8 - 12%. This is often known as being in the sweet spot in rental real estate. And we would expect a reasonable total return of 12 - 18%, if all goes well. So what are some of the downside expectations of rental real estate? First you have the responsibility of dealing with emergencies, such as fixing toilets and faucets or addressing tenant issues at possibly all hours of the day. Second, there is the time and cost of marketing the property to would-be tenants, which is usually done in the evenings and on weekends when people are available to view the property. Third, you have to contend with the monthly administration of rent collection, bill payments and bookkeeping. Fourth, you have a more restrictive ability to travel out of town for long periods of time since emergencies, showings and tenant issues can arise on a moment's notice. Now let's take a look at how selling covered call options on stock that you own can generate a monthly income similar to that of rental property income. Our upside expectations would be that: Capital appreciation would fall into the historical range for the stock market of 6-8% per year over a 10-year period. Cash flow from the monthly "rental" income of selling the covered calls would be in the range of 8 - 12%. We would expect a reasonable total return of 14 - 20%, if all goes well. And You would have no management responsibility. As well, you can be anywhere in the world for extended periods of time and still manage your investment. The downside expectations of selling covered calls are that: You have weekly research to conduct to verify if anything has changed in the stock's fundamentals, the competition and the market sector. You are unable to leverage your initial investment, unlike real estate. And you risk having your stock sold should it rise in value above your "rental" rate. However, you still get to keep the "monthly rent" and any stock appreciation above the initial stock purchase price. When looking at both investments, we would expect a similar reasonable total return on investment of around 15%. Not bad, in both cases. Where there is a clear distinction is in how much control you have over the investment. Stock investing allows you to move into and out of the market usually within 24 hours. This gives you greater flexibility to react to major market corrections. On the other hand, unloading a rental property usually takes a much longer period of time. Another huge advantage is that keeping tabs on your stock investments can be done from virtually anywhere in the world. As a rental property manager you need to be physically accessible to handle issues most days of the week. In essence, investing in the stock market does a better job of creating a time-rich lifestyle where you do not need to deal with as many pressures and time constraints as managing a rental property. If you are starting out as an investor, you may be better served learning how to invest in the wonderful world of stock investing first. Disclaimer: Any information shared on Stock Investing Simplified does not constitute financial advice. Stock Investing Simplified is not a registered investment advisor or broker-dealer and does not purport to tell or suggest which securities readers or customers should buy or sell for themselves. The Website is intended to provide general information only and does not attempt to give you advice that relates to your specific circumstances. You are advised to discuss your specific requirements with an independent financial adviser.
https://wn.com/Stock_Investing_Vs._Real_Estate_What_Is_Better
Subprime Crisis in a Nutshell - 2008, Financial Meltdown Explained

Subprime Crisis in a Nutshell - 2008, Financial Meltdown Explained

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  • Duration: 10:55
  • Updated: 13 Jan 2014
  • views: 34173
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2008, Financial Meltdown Explained A financial crisis that arose in the mortgage market after a sharp increase in mortgage foreclosures, mainly subprime, collapsed numerous mortgage lenders and hedge funds. The meltdown spilled over into the global credit market as risk premiums increased rapidly and capital liquidity was reduced. The sharp increase in foreclosures and the problems in the subprime mortgage market were largely blamed on loose lending practices, low interest rates, a housing bubble and excessive risk taking by lenders and investors. It is also known as the "subprime collapse" or "subprime crisis". Following the tech bubble and the events of September 11, the Federal Reserve stimulated a struggling economy by cutting interest rates to historically low levels. As a result, a housing bull market was created. People with poor credit got in on the action when mortgage lenders created non-traditional mortgages: interest-only loans, payment-option ARMs and mortgages with extended amortization periods. Eventually, interest rates climbed back up and many subprime borrowers defaulted when their mortgages were reset to much higher monthly payments. This left mortgage lenders with property that was worth less than the loan value due to a weakening housing market. Defaults increased; the problem snowballed, and several lenders went bankrupt. Investors and hedge funds also suffered because lenders sold mortgages they originated into the secondary market. Here the mortgages were bundled together and sold to investors as collateralized debt obligations (CDOs) and other mortgage-backed securities (MBSs). When the higher risk underlying mortgages started to default, investors were left with properties that were quickly losing value. In the wake of the meltdown, central banks released liquidity into the market place, which allowed struggling lenders and hedge funds to continue operations and make the necessary payments on their obligations.
https://wn.com/Subprime_Crisis_In_A_Nutshell_2008,_Financial_Meltdown_Explained
Why the Amazon-Whole Foods Deal Is Bad for Markets

Why the Amazon-Whole Foods Deal Is Bad for Markets

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  • Duration: 2:20
  • Updated: 16 Jun 2017
  • views: 392
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Jun.16 -- Bloomberg's Oliver Renick explains why investors aren't thrilled about Amazon.com Inc.'s purchase of Whole Foods Market Inc. He speaks with Bloomberg's Vonnie Quinn on "Bloomberg Markets."
https://wn.com/Why_The_Amazon_Whole_Foods_Deal_Is_Bad_For_Markets
Robert FREY - 180 years of Market Drawdowns

Robert FREY - 180 years of Market Drawdowns

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  • Duration: 1:02:04
  • Updated: 22 Jul 2015
  • views: 10157
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Friends of IHES held the Mathematical Finance colloquium “An Analysis of 180 Years of Market Drawdowns” on 30 June 2015 at 6.00 pm in New York, in presence of Emmanuel Ullmo, the IHÉS director. Presentation was made by Dr. Robert J. Frey, Director, Program in Quantitative Finance, Stony Brook University and former managing director with hedge funds. After 25 years as an applied mathematician in industry, the last 15 years spent in quantitative finance as a managing director with a well-known hedge fund, Dr Robert J. Frey retired in 2004 and embarked on an academic career. His focus is on risk management, modeling the process of managing complex and dynamic portfolios, particularly those that naturally arise in so-called alternative investment strategies. This interest has found its expression in two areas of research: characterizing those interactions via regime-switching models and developing policies for risk control and capital structure management through micro-simulations. Abstract: We undertake an analysis of the past 180 years of stock market drawdowns. This talk will describe a new approach to modeling this process, measure its stability of over time, and reflect on the significance of the Great Depression and other significant events, the effectiveness of monetary and fiscal interventions, and what investors can learn from a long-term view of economic and financial history. Around fifty prominent scientists and finance people participated to this fascinating conference that aroused many questions. The venue of the event was AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company, 1290 Avenue of Americas, 16th floor New York, NY 10104 on June 30, 2015, from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm. Event organized with the support of AXA Research Fund
https://wn.com/Robert_Frey_180_Years_Of_Market_Drawdowns